Epstein Becker Green’s Valerie Butera was one of sixteen legal professionals  interviewed to provide a tip for Intelivert’s recent article titled “16 Legal Tips: Handling OSHA Citations the Right Way” (Intelivert, 2016).

The article notes that the lawyers weighed in with “simple, actionable tips that can help you craft your legal strategy and directly affect the outcome of your OSHA interaction.”

FINE INCREASES AND CRIMINAL PROSECUTIONS

Ms. Butera’s tip focuses on recent increases in OSHA fines and criminal prosecutions. She explains that “now more than ever, employers should be consulting with their OSHA counsel as soon as OSHA or the EPA show up. If an OSHA violation is found, the employer is not just facing huge penalties but a prison sentence as well.”

Read the full article and contact Valerie Butera with questions and concerns.

As our regular readers know, I was recently interviewed on our firm’s new video program, Employment Law This Week.  The show has now released “bonus footage” from that episode – see below!

In the interview, I elaborate on my recent post, “Employers Beware: OSHA Fines Are on the Rise for the First Time in Twenty-Five Years.”

Thanks for watching – I’d love to know if you have any questions. (And what you think about these videos!)

 

I recently authored Epstein Becker Green’s March issue of Take 5 in which I outline actionable steps that employers can take to improve safety and avoid costly OSHA citations. Take 5 banner

Following is an excerpt:

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (“OSHA”) was created by Congress to ensure safe and healthful working conditions for employees. OSHA establishes standards and provides training and compliance assistance. It also enforces its standards with investigations and citations.

Although it’s impossible for employers to mitigate against every conceivable hazard in the workplace, there are five critical steps that every employer should take to improve safety in the workplace—and avoid costly OSHA citations. Read on for the steps:

  1. Conduct an Internal Safety and Health Audit Under Attorney-Client Privilege
  2. Create a Strong Safety Culture
  3. Ensure That Safety and Health Documentation Is Current and Well Communicated
  4. Train Employees in Safety and Health, Regularly and Comprehensively
  5. Protect Contractors and Temporary Workers, Too

Click here to read the full Take 5 online.