Featured on Employment Law This Week: The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has issued a final rule for handling retaliation under the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

The ACA prohibits employers from retaliating against employees for receiving Marketplace financial assistance when purchasing health insurance through an Exchange. The ACA also protects employees from retaliation for raising concerns regarding conduct that they believe violates the consumer protections and health insurance reforms in the ACA. OSHA’s new final rule establishes procedures and timelines for handling these complaints.  The ACA’s whistleblower provision provides for a private right of action in a U.S. district court if agencies like OSHA do not issue a final decision within certain time limits.

Watch the segment below:

By Elizabeth Bradley, Kara M. Maciel & Adam Solander

In breaking news, the Obama Administration has acknowledged the significant regulatory burdens that the Affordable Care Act’s January 1, 2014 deadline would place on employers.  Specifically, the Administration announced that in view of the complexity of the rules and reporting requirements, it is  postponing for one year, until at least 2015, the requirement that businesses cover their workers under Obamacare (i.e., there will be no penalties the first year on businesses that do not cover workers).  The move does not affect the individual mandate  and it does not affect the establishment of the Exchanges.
The Treasury Department, which enforces the law, said in its own blog post:
“The Administration is announcing that it will provide an additional year before the ACA (Affordable Care Act) mandatory employer and insurer reporting requirements begin.  This is designed to meet two goals.  First, it will allow us to consider ways to simplify the new reporting requirements consistent with the law.  Second, it will provide time to adapt health coverage and reporting systems while employers are moving toward making health coverage affordable and accessible for their employees.”
We understand that regulatory guidance will be forthcoming this week, and we will provide updates as soon as information becomes available. Stay tuned to EBG’s blogs and www.ebglaw.com for more breaking news about the ACA.

By Paul Friedman and Meg Thering

Most prudent employers have begun efforts to ensure compliance with the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (“ACA”), which is bringing about myriad changes with which employers must comply.  Many employers are evaluating their employee populations, deciding whether it makes economic sense to continue offering coverage, and performing self-audits to ensure compliance.  Employers should also be aware that the Department of Labor has already started auditing employers for compliance.  What many employers may not be aware of, however, is that employees may bring whistleblower claims for violations of the ACA – and these claims will be policed by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (“OSHA”).

The ACA prohibits retaliation against employees (as defined by the Fair Labor Standards Act) for receiving cost sharing reductions or tax credits on a Health Insurance Exchange (or Marketplace), and it prohibits retaliation against employees who report alleged violations of Title I of the ACA.  Employees who believe they have been retaliated against in violation of these rules can file a complaint with OSHA within 180 days of the alleged violation.  Here is a link to OSHA’s Fact Sheet providing more information about these provisions.

OSHA’s Fact Sheet explains: “To further these goals, the Affordable Care Act’s section 1558 provides protection to employees against retaliation by an employer for reporting alleged violations of Title I of the Act or for receiving a health insurance tax credit or cost sharing reductions as a result of participating in a Health Insurance Exchange, or Marketplace.”

The period just closed (on April 28, 2013) for comments on the interim final rule published by OSHA of “Procedures for the Handling of Retaliation Complaints Under Section 1558 of the Affordable Care Act.” Continue Reading OSHA to Police Whistleblower Claims under the Affordable Care Act