OSHA Law Update A Hazard Communication

Tag Archives: Injury & Illness Recordkeeping

OSHA Amends Its Rule Requiring Employers to Keep and Maintain Records of Recordable Injuries and Illnesses for Five Years

On December 19, 2016, the Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (“OSHA”) issued a final rule amending its record keeping regulations, located at 29 C.F.R. Part 1904. The Amendment clarifies that a covered employer has an on-going obligation to create and maintain accurate records of recordable work-place injuries and illnesses. It did so in response to the decision in AKM LLC v. Secretary of Labor, 675 F.3d 752 (D.C. Cir. 2012).

The Occupational Safety and Health Act (“Act”) requires covered employers to create and preserve records of certain workplace injuries and illnesses that are prescribed by the … Continue Reading

OSHA’s New Electronic Recordkeeping Rule Creates a Number of New Pitfalls for Employers

On May 12, 2016, OSHA published significant amendments to its recordkeeping rule, requiring many employers to submit work-related injury and illness information to the agency electronically.  The amendments also include provisions designed to prevent employers from retaliating against employees for reporting injuries and illnesses at work.  The information employers provide will be “scrubbed” of personally identifiable information and published on OSHA’s website in a searchable format.

The Basics

Every workplace with 250 or more employees will be required to electronically submit  OSHA 300 Logs, 301 Forms, and 300A summaries on an annual basis.  Workplaces with 20 or more employees in … Continue Reading

Encore Webinar: OSHA Forecast: Developments to Watch in 2015 and Beyond

Valerie Butera, Member of the Firm in the Labor and Employment practice, will present a complimentary webinar, hosted by Midwest Employers Casualty Company, on January 27 at 11:00 a.m. EST titled “OSHA Forecast: Developments to Watch in 2015 and Beyond.”

This webinar will delve into OSHA issues that will impact a wide range of industries in 2015. In addition to a greater focus on enforcements and inspections, changes will occur for recording injuries and illnesses in the OSHA 300 Injury and Illness Recordkeeping log as well as reporting changes of severe injuries or illnesses.

For more information and to register

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Complimentary Webinar Video: OSHA Forecast, 2015 and Beyond

See below for a recording of my recent webinar, “OSHA Forecast: Developments to Watch in 2015 and Beyond.”

As I discuss, in 2015, many more industries will for the first time be required by OSHA to record injuries and illnesses in the OSHA 300 Injury and Illness Recordkeeping log. The reporting of severe injuries or illnesses is also changing, and we anticipate a greater focus on enforcements and inspections.

Topics include:

  • Where we are now and the direction of OSHA in 2015
  • Recording and recordkeeping requirements
  • Whistleblowing and its impact on your business
  • Preparing for increased OSHA inspections of incidents
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Complimentary Webinar – OSHA Forecast: Developments To Watch in 2015 and Beyond

To register for this webinar, please click here.

Join Valerie Butera, Member of the Firm in the Labor and Employment practice on Wednesday, December 10, 2014 at 1:00 p.m. EST for a 60-minute webinar.

This webinar will delve deeper into OSHA issues that will impact a wider range of industries in 2015.   In addition to a greater focus on enforcements and inspections, changes will occur for recording injuries and illnesses in the OSHA 300 Injury and Illness Recordkeeping log as well as reporting changes of severe injuries or illnesses.

Topics will include:

  • Where we are now
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OSHA Injury and Illness Recordkeeping Checklist — Article Series in the Grain Journal

The Grain Journal recently published a series of seven articles by the national OSHA Practice Group at Epstein Becker Green.  The articles outline a checklist for employers to follow in order to comply with OSHA’s complex Injury & Illness Recordkeeping regulations. The articles are broken down as follows:

  1. Scope of OSHA’s Injury & Illness Recordkeeping Rule;
  2. OSHA’s Recordkeeping Forms;
  3. Recording Injuries and Illnesses;
  4. Recording Workplace Injuries/Illnesses;
  5. Miscellaneous Recording Procedures;
  6. Updating and Verifying Records; and
  7. Recordkeeping Action Plan.

Here is an excerpt from the article series:

“The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations at 29 CFR 1904 and 1952 set

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OSHA-Related New Year’s Resolutions and Wishes for 2014

As the clock ticked down and the apple dropped to start a new year, many of us reflected on the year that had passed and our resolutions and New Year’s wishes for the upcoming year.  Probably not many of you were thinking about your resolutions and New Year’s wishes as they related to everybody’s favorite regulatory agency, OSHA, so let us do that for you.  Here are three New Year’s wishes about OSHA enforcement that the national OSHA Practice Group at Epstein Becker & Green hopes to see come true in 2014 for our clients and friends in Industry:

1.      Continue Reading

Reminder — February 1st is a Critical OSHA Injury & Illness Recordkeeping Deadline

February 1st is an important annual OSHA Injury and Illness Recordkeeping deadline for all U.S. employers, except for those with only ten or fewer employees or who operate in enumerated low hazard industries such as retail, service, finance, insurance or real estate (see the industries partially exempted from OSHA’s Injury & Illness Recordkeeping regulations at Appendix A to Subpart B of Part 1904).  Specifically, by February 1st every year, employers are required

by OSHA’s Recordkeeping regulations to:

  1. Review their OSHA 300 Log;
  2. Verify that the entries are complete and accurate;
  3. Correct any deficiencies on the 300 Log;
  4. Use
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OSHA Extends Comment Period for Controversial Injury and Illness Recordkeeping Rule

Last month, we published an article about OSHA’s proposed new Injury and Illness Recordkeeping and Reporting rule that would create a minefield for hundreds of thousands of employers nationwide.  In a January 6, 2014 press release, OSHA announced that it would extend the comment period for this proposed rule by 30 days in response to a request from the National Association of Home Builders (“NAHB”).  NAHB made the request because the rulemaking overlaps with the proposed crystalline silica rulemaking and it needed more time to disseminate the relevant information to its members and coordinate responses.  March 8, 2014 is now … Continue Reading

OSHA Proposes Intrusive and Burdensome New Injury & Illness Recordkeeping and Reporting Rule

Last month, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (“OSHA”) put out a press release announcing a proposed new rule that would significantly increase employers’ injury and illness recordkeeping and reporting responsibilities.  OSHA first submitted its proposal to the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (“OIRA”) two years ago, on November 22, 2011, but OIRA did not approve the proposed rule to advance through the rulemaking process until last month.

In essence, the proposed rule would transform the current Recordkeeping framework in which employers’ records of workplace injuries remained private to the employer unless: (i) OSHA requests them during an inspection … Continue Reading

February 1st – An Important OSHA Injury & Illness Recordkeeping Deadline

By Amanda R. Strainis-Walker and Eric J. Conn

February 1st is an important annual OSHA Injury and Illness Recordkeeping deadline for all U.S. employers, except for those with only ten or fewer employees or who operate in enumerated low hazard industries such as retail, service, finance, insurance or real estate (see the exempted industries at Appendix A to Subpart B of Part 1904).  Specifically, by February 1st every year, employers are required by OSHA’s Recordkeeping regulations to:

  1. Review their OSHA 300 Log;
  2. Verify that the entries are complete and accurate;
  3. Correct any deficiencies on the 300 Log;
  4. Use
Continue Reading