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Top Issues of 2016 – Featured in Employment Law This Week

The new episode of Employment Law This Week offers a year-end roundup of the biggest employment, workforce, and management issues in 2016:

  • Impact of the Defend Trade Secrets Act
  • States Called to Ban Non-Compete Agreements
  • Paid Sick Leave Laws Expand
  • Transgender Employment Law
  • Uncertainty Over the DOL’s Overtime Rule and Salary Thresholds
  • NLRB Addresses Joint Employment
  • NLRB Rules on Union Organizing

Watch the episode below and read EBG’s Take 5 newsletter, “Top Five Employment, Labor & Workforce Management Issues of 2016.”

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Final Rule on ACA Issued by OSHA – Employment Law This Week

Featured on Employment Law This Week: The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has issued a final rule for handling retaliation under the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

The ACA prohibits employers from retaliating against employees for receiving Marketplace financial assistance when purchasing health insurance through an Exchange. The ACA also protects employees from retaliation for raising concerns regarding conduct that they believe violates the consumer protections and health insurance reforms in the ACA. OSHA’s new final rule establishes procedures and timelines for handling these complaints.  The ACA’s whistleblower provision provides for a private right of action in a U.S. district … Continue Reading

Employers Under the Microscope: Is Change on the Horizon? – Attend Our Annual Briefing (NYC, Oct. 18)

When: Tuesday, October 18, 2016 8:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Where: New York Hilton Midtown, 1335 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY 10019

Epstein Becker Green’s Annual Workforce Management Briefing will focus on the latest developments in labor and employment law, including:

  • Latest Developments from the NLRB
  • Attracting and Retaining a Diverse Workforce
  • ADA Website Compliance
  • Trade Secrets and Non-Competes
  • Managing and Administering Leave Policies
  • New Overtime Rules
  • Workplace Violence and Active-Shooter Situations
  • Recordings in the Workplace
  • Instilling Corporate Ethics

This year, we welcome Marc Freedman and Jim Plunkett from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. Marc and Jim will … Continue Reading

OSHA Targets the Health Care and Nursing Care Industries: Featured on Employment Law This Week

In one of the news stories on Employment Law This Week – Epstein Becker Green’s new video program – EBG attorney George Whipple details OSHA’s recently increased focus on the health care and nursing care industries. The agency’s fines have historically been very low, but recently OSHA cited medical patient transportation company LifeFleet for several violations totaling more than $235,000. See below to view the episode or read more about how to stay compliant and avoid heavy fines.

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Is Your Health Care Facility Prepared for the Next Pandemic Disease? Failure to Prepare Could Lead to OSHA Liability

The Ebola outbreak of October 2014 and the infection of health care workers treating infected patients in the United States  dominated the headlines and frightened the nation.  One year later, training and preparation for the next Ebola is fragmented and some nurses feel unprepared for the next pandemic disease.  The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) designated a system of 55 hospitals nationwide to manage suspected Ebola cases, but all hospitals have the potential to encounter a patient infected with Ebola or other pandemic disease, just as Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital discovered last year when a patient infected with … Continue Reading

As Promised, OSHA Targets Health Care and Nursing Homes for Enforcement Actions

As previously discussed, OSHA has been carefully scrutinizing the health care industry lately.  And on June 25, 2015, OSHA officially introduced a new compliance nightmare for the inpatient health care and nursing home industries by announcing the details of the agency’s new health care enforcement initiative in a memorandum from Dorothy Dougherty, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health, to OSHA Regional Administrators and State Plans. The memorandum is entitled “Inspection Guidance for Inpatient Healthcare Settings” (“guidance memo”).

The guidance memo requires both federal OSHA Regional Offices and State Plans to evaluate the number of work-related injuries … Continue Reading

Health Care Industry: OSHA Is Quietly Gunning for You – Is Your Workplace Ready?

On April 2, 2015, Thomas Galassi, Director of the Directorate of Enforcement for OSHA, sent a memorandum to all Regional Directors announcing that the agency’s National Emphasis Program on Nursing and Residential Care Facilities would be extended until replaced by updated guidance or removed by the agency.  Mr. Galassi went on to state that, because the health care industry reports more work-related injuries and illnesses than any other general industry,

the Agency will continue to use both enforcement and collaborative efforts to address hazards such as musculoskeletal disorders from lifting patients or residents, exposures to tuberculosis, bloodborne pathogens, workplace violence, Continue Reading

OSHA’s Increased Emphasis on Protecting Health Care and Social Service Workers from Workplace Violence

For many years, OSHA has stressed the need for enhanced workplace violence policies to protect health care and social service workers.  The agency released guidelines for workplace violence prevention in the health care and social services industries in both 1996 and 2004, recognizing that caregivers are at an increased risk of unpredictable, violent behavior from the very people whom they provide care to.  In spite of these efforts, violence in health care and social service workplaces continues to rise.  In 2013, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported more than 23,000 serious injuries due to assault at work.  More than 70 … Continue Reading

Hospitals’ Heavy Lifting: Understanding OSHA’s New Hospital Worker and Patient Safety Guidance

James S. Frank, a Member in the Health Care and Life Sciences and Labor and Employment practices, and Serra J. Schlanger, an Associate in the Health Care and Life Sciences practice, co-authored an article for the American Health Lawyers Association (AHLA) entitled “Hospitals’ Heavy Lifting:  Understanding OSHA’s New Hospital Worker and Patient Safety Guidance.”

The article, published in AHLA’s Spring 2014 Labor & Employment publication, summarizes OSHA’s new web-based “Worker Safety in Hospitals” guidance, explains how the guidance relates to OSHA’s existing regulatory framework, and details what OSHA considers necessary for an effective Safe Patient Handling Systems as … Continue Reading

OSHA Launches Ergonomics Campaign in Healthcare Industries

By Eric J. Conn, Head of Epstein Becker & Green’s OSHA Practice Group

OSHA recently announced a campaign to raise awareness about the hazards likely to cause musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) among health care workers responsible for patient care.  Common MSDs suffered in the patient care industry include sprains, strains, soft tissue and back injuries.  These injuries are due in large part to over exertion related to manual patient handling activities, often involving heavy lifting associated with transferring and repositioning patients and working in awkward positions.

“The best control for MSDs is an effective prevention program,” said MaryAnn Garrahan, OSHA’s Regional

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Breaking News: ACA Employer Mandate Delayed to 2015

By Elizabeth Bradley, Kara M. Maciel & Adam Solander

In breaking news, the Obama Administration has acknowledged the significant regulatory burdens that the Affordable Care Act’s January 1, 2014 deadline would place on employers.  Specifically, the Administration announced that in view of the complexity of the rules and reporting requirements, it is  postponing for one year, until at least 2015, the requirement that businesses cover their workers under Obamacare (i.e., there will be no penalties the first year on businesses that do not cover workers).  The move does not affect the individual mandate  and it does not affect the establishment … Continue Reading

OSHA Claims Its Severe Violator Enforcement Program is “Off to a Strong Start”

By Eric J. Conn, Head of the OSHA Group at Epstein Becker & Green

Introduction

OSHA recently issued a White Paper analyzing the first 18 months of its controversial enforcement initiative known as the Severe Violator Enforcement Program (“SVEP”).  Despite mounting evidence to the contrary, the White Paper somehow concludes that the SVEP is “off to a strong start,” and that it “is already meeting certain key goals,” including:

  1. Successfully identifying recalcitrant employers who disregard their OSH Act obligations; and
  2. Effectively allocating OSHA’s follow-up enforcement resources “by targeting high-emphasis hazards, facilitating inspections across multiple worksites of employers found to be
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5 Actions To Consider Regarding the Affordable Care Act

By Greta Ravitsky

The Labor and Employment practice at Epstein Becker Green publishes a regular newsletter called “Take 5: Views You Can Use,” which addresses 5 L&E topics around a related subject.  The January 2013 edition of Take 5 includes some important workplace health issues associated with implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), so we are providing a link to it here on the OSHA Law Update Blog.

In this month’s Take 5 newsletter, one of EBG’s Houston office Labor and Employment Partners, Greta Ravitsky, summarizes five important actions for employers to consider, as the Department of Labor steps … Continue Reading

Employer-Sponsored Wellness Program Held Lawful Under the ADA

By Frank C. Morris, Jr. and Jordan B. Schwartz

An employer’s wellness program—despite certain “penalty” provisions—was recently held not to be discriminatory under the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”) by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit in Seff v. Broward County.  The Eleventh Circuit found the wellness program, sponsored by Broward County, Florida (“County”), was established as a term of the County’s insured group health plan and, as such, fell under the ADA’s bona fide benefit plan “safe harbor” provision.  This ruling is welcome news for employers with or considering wellness programs.

However, if the County’s … Continue Reading

OSHA Delays I2P2 Rulemaking . . . Again

By Eric J. Conn

In what seems to be a trend, OSHA has again delayed its rulemaking process for an Injury and Illness Prevention Program (commonly known as I2P2) standard. The announcement came during a National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health meeting in late June.  According to OSHA officials, we should not expect the next rulemaking phase, a small business review process, to begin until at least Labor Day.  I2P2 programs, which aim to reduce workplace injuries by requiring employers to proactively find and fix workplace hazards, have been on OSHA’s regulatory radar for quite some time.

Agency … Continue Reading

OSHA’s Enterprise-Wide Approach to Enforcement

This week, Washington Legal Foundation published an article  regarding OSHA’s New Enterprise-Wide Approach to Enforcement, authored by EBG attorneys Eric J. Conn and Alexis M. Downs.  The article expands on a February 2012 post entitled “Enterprise Enforcement: OSHA’s Attack on Employers with Multiple Locations,” here on the OSHA Law Update Blog.

The gist of the article and the prior blog post is that companies that operate multiple facilities in different locations, such as national retail and grocery chains, grain cooperatives, large national nursing and medical care organizations, manufacturers, hotel groups, and many others, need to be aware of four new … Continue Reading

EHS Today Article: HazCom Gets a Facelift

Last week, EHS Today Magazine ran our article in which we delve into more detail about OSHA’s amended Hazard Communication Rule (“HazCom”), and the integration of the United Nations’ Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (“GHS”).  Check out the full article here, in which we detailed 10 important things employers need to know about the final HazCom Rule.  Here’s the short list:

  1. New Hazard Classification Criteria
  2. New Method for Evaluating Mixtures
  3. Amended Label Requirements
  4. Proscrictive Format for Safety Data Sheet
  5. Inclusion of Non-Mandatory Threshold Limit Values in SDSs
  6. Information and Training Requirements
  7. Other Effective Dates
  8. Inclusion of
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Workplace Violence Policies and Background Checks Are Essential Components of a Prevention Plan

By Kara M. Maciel

Sadly, workplace violence continues to be a topic that challenges many organizations.  Indeed, as the news reports continue to remind us, employees and non-employees often take out their aggression and violent acts within the workplace.  As the recent attacks at hospitals in Pittsburgh and in Washington, D.C. demonstrate, there remains a high rate of fatal and non-fatal assaults and violent acts committed within the workplace, and, in particular, within the healthcare industry.  One of the struggles that employers face is trying to prevent violent conduct by third-party non-employees who are generally beyond the control of the … Continue Reading

OSHA Launches New Nursing Home National Emphasis Program

By Julia E. Loyd and Eric J. Conn

Last week, the U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (“OSHA”) launched a new National Emphasis Program targeting Nursing Homes and Residential Care facilities (“Nursing Home NEP”).  In an accompanying Press Release, OSHA announced that the Nursing Home NEP aims to protect workers from safety and health hazards “common in medical industries.”  Effective upon its announcement and for a three-year period thereafter, the NEP focuses on ergonomic hazards (e.g., strains and sprains from patient  handling), exposure to bloodborne pathogens (e.g., needlestick injuries), workplace violence (e.g., assaults by patients or others), … Continue Reading

GHS & HazCom: 10 Things Employers Must Know About OSHA’s New Hazard Communication Standard

By Eric J. Conn and Casey M. Cosentino

Following a March 20, 2012 Press Release, on March 26, 2012, OSHA issued its much anticipated final Hazard Communication Rule (“HazCom”), which integrates the United Nations’ Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (“GHS”) into OSHA’s old Hazard Communication Standard (“HazCom” or “HCS”).  The new HazCom Standard requires employers to classify chemicals according to their health and physical hazards, and to adopt new, consistent formats for labels and Safety Data Sheets (“SDS’s”) for all chemicals manufactured or imported in the United States.  According to Assistant Secretary Michaels, “OSHA’s 1983 Hazard … Continue Reading

Managing an OSHA Inspection: Answers to 5 Frequently Asked Questions

By Eric J. Conn

Below is a set of important questions that we are frequently asked by clients when OSHA unexpectedly shows up at their doorsteps.  These questions and many more are also addressed in our OSHA Inspection Checklist desk reference guide.

*          *          *          *          *          *          *          *

Scenario 1:   An OSHA Compliance Safety and Health Officer (CSHO) arrives unannounced to begin an inspection, but the employer’s representative whom the employer desires to manage the OSHA inspection is not present at the workplace.  Can the employer request that the CSHO return later or wait to start the inspection … Continue Reading

Enterprise Enforcement: OSHA’s Attack on Employers with Multiple Locations

By Alexis M. Downs and Eric J. Conn

Companies that operate multiple facilities in different locations, such as national retail stores, grocery chains, manufacturers, and hotel chains, need to be aware of three new OSHA enforcement trends with enterprise-wide consequences:

  • A rise in follow-up inspections and Repeat violations at sister facilities within a corporate family;
  • OSHA’s increasing pursuit of company-wide abatement provisions in settlement agreements; and
  • OSHA’s recent requests for enterprise-wide relief from the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.

Follow-up Inspections and Repeat Violations:

The most significant trend impacting employers with multiple locations is OSHA’s recent fascination with Follow-up … Continue Reading

OSHA Targets Manufacturers, Nursing Care Facilities, and Chemical Plants

By Eric J. Conn

What do manufacturers, nursing homes, and chemical companies have in common?  They all represent industries receiving special enforcement scrutiny from today’s OSHA.

OSHA is targeting manufacturers under a major Recordkeeping Enforcement National Emphasis Program (Recordkeeping NEP).  OSHA launched the Recordkeeping NEP at the end of 2009, originally selecting inspection targets across a wide array of industries.  A senior OSHA official has explained that “there are several different goals here.  One is just to find out what’s going on.  Another is to send a message to companies – via penalties – that injury and illness book-cooking won’t

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